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The Basics


When you follow the directions on the medicine’s label or from your pharmacist, doctor, or nurse, you get the best results.

There are simple steps you can take to avoid problems.

  • Follow the medicine’s directions carefully.
  • If you don’t understand the medicine’s directions, ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist to explain them to you.
  • Keep a list of all the medicines, vitamins, minerals, and herbs you use. Share this information with your doctor.
  • Put your medicines in a cool, dry place where children and pets can’t see or get to them.

Over-the-counter medicines 


Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are medicines you can buy at a store without a prescription. All OTC medicines come with a Drug Facts label. This label can help you choose the right OTC medicine for you and your problem.

The label also gives you instructions for using the medicine safely. Even OTC medicines can cause side effects or harm you if you use too much or don’t use them correctly.

Some examples of OTC medicines include:

  • Cold and flu medicines
  • Pain medicines like aspirin, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen
  • Allergy medicines
  • Sleep aids
  • Toothpaste with fluoride
  • Antiperspirant (found in many underarm deodorants)

Follow the directions on the Drug Facts label to lower your chances of side effects.

Learn more about the information on an OTC Drug Facts label.

Take Action!

Prevent problems and mistakes with your medicines.

Follow directions carefully.

Be sure to read directions carefully when taking prescription or over-the-counter (OTC) medicines.

Even OTC medicines can cause problems or harm you if you use too much or don’t use them correctly. Be sure to follow the directions on the Drug Facts label.

If you notice unpleasant changes after taking medicine, like feeling dizzy or having an upset stomach, call your doctor or nurse.

Review this guide to using OTC medicines safely [PDF - 944 KB].

Talk to your doctor.

Before you use any new prescription medicines, tell your doctor:

  • About other medicines you use – both prescription and OTC medicines
  • About any vitamins, minerals, or herbs you use
  • If you are allergic to any medicines
  • If you have had side effects after using any medicines
  • If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, because some medicines may harm your baby

Keep taking prescription medicines until your doctor tells you it’s okay to stop – even if you are feeling better.


Ask questions to make sure you understand.

To use a medicine safely, you need to know:

  • What the medicine is
  • Why you are using the medicine
  • How to use the medicine the right way
  • If there are any medicines you shouldn’t take with this one

Ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist questions to be sure you understand how to use your medicine.

Keep track of your medicines.

  • Make a list of the medicines you use [PDF - 340 KB]. Write down how much you use and when you use each medicine.
  • Take the list with you when you go to the doctor or nurse. You may want to make a copy to give to a family member or friend.
  • Read and save any information that comes with your medicine.
  • Keep your medicine in the box or bottle it came in so you have all of the label information.
  • Pay attention to the color and shape of your pills. If they look different when you get a refill, ask your pharmacist to double-check that you have the right medicine.

Put your medicines in a safe place.

Medicines that are stored correctly last longer and work better.

Call the Poison Control Center (1-800-222-1222) right away if a child or someone else accidentally uses your medicine.


 

 

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Use Medicines Safely


Content last updated on:
February 21, 2014

The Basics

Medicines can help you feel better and get well. But if you don’t follow the directions, medicines can hurt you.

You can lower your chances of side effects (unwanted or unexpected effects) from medicines by following directions carefully. Side effects may be mild, like an upset stomach. Other side effects can be more serious, like damage to your liver.

When you follow the directions on the medicine’s label or from your pharmacist, doctor, or nurse, you get the best results.

There are simple steps you can take to avoid problems.

  • Follow the medicine’s directions carefully.
  • If you don’t understand the medicine’s directions, ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist to explain them to you.
  • Keep a list of all the medicines, vitamins, minerals, and herbs you use. Share this information with your doctor.
  • Put your medicines in a cool, dry place where children and pets can’t see or get to them.

There are different types of medicine.
The 2 main types of medicine are prescription and over the counter (OTC).

Prescription medicines
Prescription medicines are medicines you can get only with a prescription (or order) from your doctor. You get this medicine at a pharmacy.

  • Prescription medicines shouldn’t be used by anyone except the person whose name is on the prescription.
  • Throw away expired (out-of-date) or unused prescription medicines. Ask your pharmacist about the safest way to throw medicines away.

Sometimes you can choose between a generic medicine and a brand name medicine. Generic and brand name medicines work the same way. Generic medicine usually costs less.

Talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or insurance company for more information about generic medicines. Learn more about generic medicines.

Over-the-counter medicines 
Over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are medicines you can buy at a store without a prescription. All OTC medicines come with a Drug Facts label. This label can help you choose the right OTC medicine for you and your problem.

The label also gives you instructions for using the medicine safely. Even OTC medicines can cause side effects or harm you if you use too much or don’t use them correctly.

Some examples of OTC medicines include:

  • Cold and flu medicines
  • Pain medicines like aspirin, acetaminophen, and ibuprofen
  • Allergy medicines
  • Sleep aids
  • Toothpaste with fluoride
  • Antiperspirant (found in many underarm deodorants)

Follow the directions on the label to lower your chances of side effects.

Learn more about what’s on an OTC Drug Facts label.

Take Action!

Take Action!

Prevent problems and mistakes with your medicines.

Follow directions carefully.
Be sure to read the Drug Facts label carefully. Even over-the-counter (OTC) medicines can cause problems or harm you if you use too much or don’t use them correctly.

If you notice unpleasant changes after taking medicine, like feeling dizzy or having an upset stomach, call your doctor or nurse.

Review this guide to using OTC medicines safely [PDF - 944 KB].

Talk to your doctor.
Before you use any new prescription medicines, tell your doctor:

  • About other medicines you use – both prescription and OTC medicines
  • About any vitamins, minerals, or herbs you use
  • If you are allergic to any medicines
  • If you have had side effects after using any medicines
  • If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, because some medicines may harm your baby

Keep taking prescription medicines until your doctor tells you it’s okay to stop – even if you are feeling better.

Ask questions to make sure you understand.
To use a medicine safely, you need to know:

  • What the medicine is
  • Why you are using the medicine
  • How to use the medicine the right way

Ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist questions to be sure you understand how to use your medicine.

Keep track of your medicines.

  • Make a list of the medicines you use [PDF - 340 KB]. Write down how much you use and when you use each medicine.
  • Take this list with you when you go to the doctor or nurse. You may want to make a copy to give to a family member or friend.
  • Make sure to read and save any information that comes with your medicine.
  • Keep your medicine in the box or bottle it came in so you have all of the label information.
  • Pay attention to the color and shape of your pills. If they look different when you get a refill, ask your pharmacist to double-check that you have the right medicine.

Put your medicines in a safe place.
Medicines that are stored correctly last longer and work better.

Call the Poison Control Center (1-800-222-12221-800-222-1222) right away if a child or someone else accidentally uses your medicine.

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